Make Your Own Gifts and Home Goods for the Holidays


You're always going into stores and pointing to things and saying, "I could make that myself." But do you ever get around to doing it? Nope. Make the New Year different by tackling a home goods craft project from Kata Golda's Hand-Stitched Felt, a new book filled with easy and practical sewing projects.

We liked the practical step-by-step advice from Ms. Golda, a self-taught crafter. She loves the marks made with hand stitches and as she started out making soft toys out of wool felt for her child, she began to add new crafts to her bag of tricks. Her book features 25 "whimsical" projects and you'll need no more than a needle, pen, scissors, felt, and threat. You'll be torn as to what to make first of the toys, decor, and practical home items she walks you through (and sometimes even provides cut-out templates to help make your end results foolproof). These home goods projects caught our eye.

  • Holds Everything Bucket, a floppy felt bucket that's a great storage solution and can be used for toys, crafting supplies, magazines, or even as a "gift basket" filled with thoughtfully selected items.
  • Gift Wrap Tag, a lovely way to perk up any wrapped present and use leftover felt scraps.
  • Terra-Cotta Pot Cozy, a colorful and artistic wrap to decorate houseplants with a bonus -- in cooler months, the cozy will keep the roots warmer and wool's moisture-wicking properties will prevent water from evaporating through the terra-cotta.

  • Songbird Mug Cozy and Coaster, a decorative way to keep your drink warm and keep your furniture protected when you set your drink down.
  • Textured Pillows, lovely, soft wool felt pillows for any room of the house, with playful shapes and animals complementing one another. If you're looking at one way to perk up your interiors in the New Year, try making a variety of these perky pillows.
  • And many other great projects, including a Picture Perfect Bunny Patch, a Photo Pocket, Baby's Giraffe Quilt, a Patchwork Curtain, and a Patchwork Potholder.

 

 

Jay JohnsonComment